Does O.J. deserve freedom?

O.J. Simpson speaks during his sentencing hearing at the Clark County Regional Justice Center in Las Vegas, Friday, Dec. 5, 2008. Sitting right to Simpson is his lawyer Yale Galanter. Simpson was sentenced Friday to at least 15 years in prison for a hotel armed robbery after a judge rejected his apology and said, "It was much more than stupidity." (AP Photo/Isaac Brekken, Pool)

O.J. Simpson could be released from prison soon. 

Why Simpson’s in prison:

O.J. Simpson has been incarcerated at Lovelock Correctional Center in Nevada since 2008 after being sentenced to 33 years in prison, all stemming from an incident at a Las Vegas hotel room from which Simpson attempted to forcefully reclaim memorabilia.

The former Bills star and Hall of Fame running back, now 70, was charged with and found guilty on 12 counts, including conspiracy, burglary, robbery, kidnapping and assault with a deadly weapon.

Could be granted parole:

Incarcerated since 2008, he is due to go before the Nevada parole board as early as this summer. Depending on the board’s recommendation, 2017 might well be the year that perhaps the most famous inmate in America—the subject of an award-winning documentary and an award-winning scripted show two decades after his Trial of the Century—returns to society.

According to SI:

The decision to grant parole is, by definition, discretionary. But it is a decision that Thomas Patton, a former chairman of the parole board in Nevada, stresses is conducted through a “very comprehensive review,” weighing 11 largely objective factors. Between -1 and +2 points are allocated for each criterion. Inmates exceeding five points are classified as a “medium” or “high” risk and are unlikely to be granted parole. Score fewer than five points, and odds swing the other way. In 2013, Simpson scored three points, falling into the “low risk” category. He seems likely to do well again in 2017.

  • Age at the time of first arrest (0 points
  • Prior probation or parole revocation (0 points)
  • Employment history immediately before arrest (0 points)
  • Offense leading to current or prior convictions (2 points)
  • History of drug or alcohol abuse (0 points or 1 point)
  • Gender (1 point)
  • Current age (-1 point)
  • Active gang membership (0 points)
  • Completed education, vocational or treatment program during prison term (-1 point or 0 points)
  • Disciplinary write-ups (-1 point)
  • Custody level (0 points)

A look back on Simpson:

In 1995 he was acquitted of the murders of his ex-wife Nicole Brown and her friend Ron Goldman. Nerves from that verdict remain raw. And they were exposed further last year with the release of the transcendent documentary O.J.: Made in America, which argued to great effect that the jurors’ verdict was less about the merits of the case than it was about exacting karmic justice on the LAPD for years of perceived racial bigotry.

Two years later—before a different jury and facing a lower burden of proof—the families of Brown and Goldman won a wrongful-death civil suit against Simpson. He was ordered to pay $33.5 million in damages but has avoided that obligation, using federal and state laws that exclude certain assets from civil forfeiture, and moving to Florida, where, under the state’s homestead exemption, forced sale of residences can be blocked.

FX’s The People v. O.J. Simpson won 9 Prime Time Emmy’s.

What do you think? Does OJ deserve to stay in prison for the rest of his life?

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